Warner-Patterson Co., 918 So. Michigan Ave., Chicago

From: OUTING Sport-Adventure Travel-Fiction Vol. 74 no. 6 (April to September 1919), pages. 377-378

Warner Fountain Shaving Brush article

"All But the Razor

Back in the eighteenth century Samuel Johnson remarked to the ever attentive Boswell that no two men used the same methods in shaving ---or words to that effect. The shave of that early day was a more complicated proceeding than it is in this twentieth century. The era of the safety razor and other tonsorial developments have distinctly simplified and more or less standardized the chore of shaving Johnson's words hardly hold true today.

Little things may be more vital in the life of the average man than big events. That is why any new development that makes shaving more simple is examined with considerable interest. And when we recently saw the announcement of a combined brush and soap tube we hot footed after it to find out if it would really work. Happily enough it did This device is known as the Warner Fountain Shaving Brush. It is especially valuable for any one who travels. Ordinarily one of the easiest things in the world to forget on a trip is shaving soap In this case you can t forget it for it is safely stowed away in the brush itself. 

This fountain shaving brush is just what its name implies. Stowed away inside the hollow metal handle is a cartridge of shaving cream--- sufficient for about sixty shaves; at the upper end of the cartridge is a flexible rubber tube which runs about half way up into the brush itself. At the bottom of the handle is a screw arrangement which when turned spurts the cream into the bristles of the brush. You simply wet the brush give the bottom screw a turn or two, and then lather away at your face. When the cream has been used up after its allotted number of shaves you take the old cartridge out and put a new one in.

There is an outside metal telescope sleeve fitting over the handle of the brush. This is to keep the damp brush from coming in contact with the clothing in the traveling bag. A cap fits over the top of this. The entire outfit is about six inches long and one inch in diameter."

From: N.A.R.D. Journal, Vol. 27 (October 10,1918), page 445

Warner Fountain Shaving brush article

"One of the interesting curiosities at the N. A. R. D. Convention and Drug Show was the exhibit of the Warner Fountain Shaving Brush which proved to be one of the centers of attraction at the Hotel Grunewald, New Orleans, September 16 to 20. The exhibit was in charge of Geo. G. Weidner and J. J. Moonan, representatives of the Warner-Patterson Company of Chicago, makers of this sensational brush and a picture of the display is shown above.

The Warner Fountain Shaving Brush is probably the most unique article that has been introduced to the trade since the advent of the fountain pen. The fact is that the brush works on very much the same principle as the latter, for it carries the shaving cream in the handle of the brush much as a fountain pen holds ink.

Since the national agitation against anthrax germs in shaving brushes, which has received so much attention from the United States War Department and in public prints, the Warner brush has risen in high favor. The reason is that the Rubberset Company, who manufacture the brush for the Warner-Patterson company, guarantee their product to be thoroughly sterilized and free from germs when it leaves the factory. But more than that, the brush-end of the Warner can be unscrewed in a moment and easily sterilized merely by dropping it in boiling water whenever the user desires.

 The Warner Fountain Shaving Brush was launched in October when the makers began a costly national advertising campaign in such powerful consumer media as the Saturday Evening Post, Colliers Weekly and Literary Digest. Other publications have since been added and the campaign is gaining impetus each month."

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Disclaimer:  This site is not affiliated or endorsed by Rubberset Company, a division of the Sherwin-Williams Company.  Rubberset Company has a website with their summarized history here.  This site is exclusively concerned with the early history of the company as it relates to their shaving brushes and was compiled from public information freely available on the web.  It is intended to be informational in nature, not commercial.